Mental Health Quotes challenging +controversial.

Hi Guys,

The last couple of days, I have scoured the internet for Mental Health quotes that were good, bad and ugly. I think all of these stimulate conversation or thoughts in your mind. If they do, then this has been a successful blog entry! There is a lot here and Anti Psychiatry gets an outing!.

“The bravest thing I ever did was continuing my life when I wanted to die.”
― Juliette Lewis
“The problem with having problems is that ‘someone’ always has it worse.”
― Tiffany Madison
“PTSD is a whole-body tragedy, an integral human event of enormous proportions with massive repercussions.” Susan Pease Banitt
“Sometimes the world is so much sicker than the inmates of its institutions.”
― Joanne Greenberg
“The only time it’s hopeless is when you’re dead! Long as you’re alive, you can get better – you can make it better.”
― RoAnna Sylver
“There is no standard normal. Normal is subjective. There are seven billion versions of normal on this planet.”- Matt Haig
“It is not the bruises on the body that hurt. It is the wounds of the heart and the scars on the mind.”
― Aisha Mirza
“John raised an eyebrow. “So you wouldn’t date someone like you?”
“Oh, hell, no. I’m insane, but that would be nuts.”
― Forrest Carr
“I’ve got to that point in life when there’s very few thrills and lots of pills seems we all end up this way. As we wait for our final day. But there’s one thing about the pills I take. My manic episodes have taken a break” Stanley Victor Paskavich
Keedwell cites a study of depression in the Netherlands that found that most people coped better with adversity after experiencing depression.”
― Jan Wong
“To think too much is a disease.”
― Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
“Whatever you did today is enough. Whatever you felt today is valid. Whatever you thought today isn’t to be judged. Repeat the above each day.”
― Brittany Burgunder
“The human being is so complicated in some ways, and yet so simple in others. Sometimes, we need complex medication regimens. Yet, sometimes, we just need a good cry.”
― Vironika Tugaleva
“Sometimes, when you want to help a broken person, your attempts only remind them of their missing pieces.”
― Gaia B. Amman,
“Most of us feel isolated and paranoid during stressful times. We feel alone in the wilderness.”
― Patricia Cornwell

“Life isn’t always easy. I struggle day to day. But I choose to live life to the fullest and keep reminding myself that I am stronger than ANYTHING that stands in my way.”
― Tanya Masse
“The trick when it comes to dealing with depression is being able to imagine yourself out of it. When you can picture a happier life, you will be determined to work at the things that prevent it from happening.”
― Keysha Jade

“I remember, when I was about ten years old, working out that I would be thirty-six in the year 2000. It seemed so far away, so old, so unreal. And here I am, a fucked, crazy, anorexic-alcoholic-childless beautiful woman. I never dreamed it would be like this.”
― Tracey Emin
“Depression is like being under house arrest, only there is no house.”
― Lisa Eley,
“When you come out of the grips of a depression there is an incredible relief, but not one you feel allowed to celebrate. Instead, the feeling of victory is replaced with anxiety that it will happen again, and with shame and vulnerability when you see how your illness affected your family, your work, everything left untouched while you struggled to survive. We come back to life thinner, paler, weaker … but as survivors. Survivors who don’t get pats on the back from coworkers who congratulate them on making it. Survivors who wake to more work than before because their friends and family are exhausted from helping them fight a battle they may not even understand. I hope to one day see a sea of people all wearing silver ribbons as a sign that they understand the secret battle, and as a celebration of the victories made each day as we individually pull ourselves up out of our foxholes to see our scars heal, and to remember what the sun looks like.”- Jenny Lawson
“One of the things that baffles me (and there are quite a few) is how there can be so much lingering stigma with regards to mental illness, specifically bipolar disorder. In my opinion, living with manic depression takes a tremendous amount of balls. Not unlike a tour of Afghanistan (though the bombs and bullets, in this case, come from the inside). At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you’re living with this illness and functioning at all, it’s something to be proud of, not ashamed of.
They should issue medals along with the steady stream of medication.”
― Carrie Fisher,
“Because now people use the phrase OCD to describe minor personality quirks. “Oooh, I like my pens in a line, I’m so OCD.”
NO YOU’RE FUCKING NOT.
“Oh my God, I was so nervous about that presentation, I literally had a panic attack.”
NO YOU FUCKING DIDN’T.
“I’m so hormonal today. I just feel totally bipolar.”
SHUT UP, YOU IGNORANT $*XXXz&£€
― Holly Bourne
“When the black thing was at its worst, when the illicit cocktails and the ten-mile runs stopped working, I would feel numb as if dead to the world. I moved unconsciously, with heavy limbs, like a zombie from a horror film. I felt a pain so fierce and persistent deep inside me, I was tempted to take the chopping knife in the kitchen and cut the black thing out I would lie on my bed staring at the ceiling thinking about that knife and using all my limited powers of self-control to stop myself from going downstairs to get it.”
― Alice Jamieson

“The pain of severe depression is quite unimaginable to those who have not suffered it, and it kills in many instances because its anguish can no longer be borne. The prevention of many suicides will continue to be hindered until there is a general awareness of the nature of this pain.”
― William Styron
“The return of the voices would end in a migraine that made my whole body throb. I could do nothing except lie in a blacked-out room waiting for the voices to get infected by the pains in my head and clear off.

Knowing I was different with my OCD, anorexia and the voices that no one else seemed to hear made me feel isolated, disconnected. I took everything too seriously. I analysed things to death. I turned every word, and the intonation of every word over in my mind trying to decide exactly what it meant, whether there was a subtext or an implied criticism. I tried to recall the expressions on people’s faces, how those expressions changed, what they meant, whether what they said and the look on their faces matched and were therefore genuine or whether it was a sham, the kind word touched by irony or sarcasm, the smile that means pity.
When people looked at me closely could they see the little girl in my head, being abused in those pornographic clips projected behind my eyes?
That is what I would often be thinking and such thoughts ate away at the façade of self-confidence I was constantly raising and repairing.

(describing dissociative identity disorder/mpd symptoms)”
― Alice Jamieson

The DSM-IV-TR is a 943-page textbook published by the American Psychiatric Association that sells for $99…There are currently 374 mental disorders. I bought the book…and leafed through it…I closed the manual. “I wonder if I’ve got any of the 374 mental disorders,” I thought. I opened the manual again. And instantly diagnosed myself with twelve different ones.”
― Jon Ronson

Sadly, psychiatric training still includes far too little on the very serious psychiatric sequelae of childhood trauma, especially CSA [child sexual abuse]. There is inadequate recognition within mental health services of the prevalence and importance of Dissociative Disorders, sufferers of which are frequently misdiagnosed as Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), or, in the cases of DID, schizophrenia.

This is to some extent understandable as some of the features of DID appear superficially to mimic those of schizophrenia and/or Borderline Personality Disorder.”
― Joan Coleman,
wish bad brain stuff was an actual guy I could punch in the face. PTSD, panic attacks, anxiety, flashbacks, hallucinations, anything that gives you hell, could just send’em to me, I’d fight them all. […] Stuff’s a lot harder to fight when they’re stuck in your own head.”
“Yeah… didn’t stop me from trying, though.”
― RoAnna Sylver
“It’s a little-known secret, and it should probably stay that way: attempting suicide usually jump-starts your brain chemistry. There must be something about taking all those pills that either floods the brain sufficiently or depletes it so completely that balance is restored. Whatever the mechanism, the result is that you emerge on the other side of the attempt with an awareness of what it means to be alive. Simple acts seem miraculous: you can stand transfixed for hours just watching the wind ruffle the tiny hairs along the top of your arm. And always, with every sensation, is the knowledge that you must have survived for a reason. You just can’t doubt it anymore. You must have a purpose, or you would have died. You have the rest of your life to discover what that purpose is. And you can’t wait to start looking.”
― Terri Cheney,
ANTI PSYCHIATRY!
“Some of the most evil human beings in the world are psychiatrists. Not all psychiatrists. Some psychiatrists are selfless, caring people who really want to help. But the sad truth is that in today’s society, mental health isn’t a science. It’s an industry. Ritalin, Zoloft, Prozac, Lexapro, Resperidone, happy pills that are supposed to “normalize” the behavior of our families, our colleagues, our friends – tell me that doesn’t sound the least bit creepy! Mental health is subjective. To us, a little girl talking to her pretend friends instead of other children might just be harmless playing around. To a psychiatrist, it’s a financial opportunity. Automatically, the kid could be swept up in a sea of labels. “not talking to other kids? Okay, she’s asocial!” or “imaginary friends? Bingo, she has schizophrenia!” I’m not saying in any way that schizophrenia and social disorders aren’t real. But the alarming number of people, especially children, who seem to have these “illnesses” and need to be medicated or locked up… it’s horrifying. The psychiatrists get their prestigious reputation and their money to burn. The drug companies get fast cash and a chance to claim that they’ve discovered a wonder-drug, capable of “curing” anyone who might be a burden on society… that’s what it’s all about. It’s not about really talking to these troubled people and finding out what they need. It’s about giving them a pill that fits a pattern, a weapon to normalize people who might make society uncomfortable. The psychiatrists get their weapon. Today’s generations get cheated out of their childhoods. The mental health industry takes the world’s most vulnerable people and messes with their heads, giving them controlled substances just because they don’t fit the normal puzzle. And sadly, it’s more or less going to get worse in this rapidly advancing century.”
― Rebecca McNutt
“The human being is so complicated in some ways, and yet so simple in others. Sometimes, we need complex medication regimens. Yet, sometimes, we just need a good cry.”
― Vironika Tugaleva
“In response to threat and injury, animals, including humans, execute biologically based, non-conscious action patterns that prepare them to meet the threat and defend themselves. The very structure of trauma, including activation, dissociation and freezing are based on the evolution of survival behaviors. When threatened or injured, all animals draw from a “library” of possible responses. We orient, dodge, duck, stiffen, brace, retract, fight, flee, freeze, collapse, etc. All of these coordinated responses are somatically based- they are things that the body does to protect and defend itself. It is when these orienting and defending responses are overwhelmed that we see trauma.

The bodies of traumatized people portray “snapshots” of their unsuccessful attempts to defend themselves in the face of threat and injury. Trauma is a highly activated incomplete biological response to threat, frozen in time. For example, when we prepare to fight or to flee, muscles throughout our entire body are tensed in specific patterns of high energy readiness. When we are unable to complete the appropriate actions, we fail to discharge the tremendous energy generated by our survival preparations. This energy becomes fixed in specific patterns of neuromuscular readiness. The person then stays in a state of acute and then chronic arousal and dysfunction in the central nervous system. Traumatized people are not suffering from a disease in the normal sense of the word- they have become stuck in an aroused state. It is difficult if not impossible to function normally under these circumstances.”
― Peter A. Levine
“Do You Have DID?

Determining if you have DID isn’t as easy as it sounds. In fact, many clinicians and psychotherapists have such difficulty figuring out whether or not people have DID that it typically takes them several years to provide an accurate diagnosis. Because many of the symptoms of DID overlap with other psychological diagnoses, as well as normal occurrences such as forgetfulness or talking to yourself, there is a great deal of confusion in making the diagnosis of DID. Although this section will provide you with information which may help you determine if you have DID, it is a good idea to consult with a professional in the mental health field so that you can have further confirmation of your findings.”
― Karen Marshal
A day in heaven,’ Adam whispered. What would that be like? To wake up one morning and be normal? To not bite down and parcel out each second of each day. To not wrestle and negotiate with your obsessions. To not have thoughts that ran you into the ground.
To have a quiet  mind.
A quiet mind.
Quiet.”
― Teresa Toten

AOC